Tips

The One Thing You Should Never Do to Your Luggage Before You Fly

You may think it's a good idea, but you're really making a big mistake.
IMAGE GETTY / JAMINWELL
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Vacations are all about having fun, relaxing, and getting the opportunity to escape from everyday reality. But as all of us Type-A people will relate to, we can only truly relax once we know that everything is safe and secure—our home, money, and luggage included.

To ensure the safety of your suitcase, and avoid it getting lost, you may be tempted to add an identification tag with your name and address either in or on your bag.

But this could be a big mistake. Rather than adding to security, it may, in fact, do the exact opposite...


Richard Clive Owens, a regular traveler for work and events, told Mamamia what he believes to be the problem. Putting an ID "says 'this house is empty, please burgle—and take your time,'" he says. "Don't put a friend's house because the burglars don't know it's a friend's house and will still burgle it."

As an alternative, he suggested putting a work address and your mobile phone number. "Then, even if your phone has a problem, your name and work address will help you and your underwear get reunited."

Another piece of advice he offers is to take a picture of your luggage and add it to a word document with your contact details, which you can carry with you.

From: Country Living

This story originally appeared on Townandcountrymag.com.
* Minor edits have been made by the Townandcountry.ph editors.

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Katie Avis-Riordan
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