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What Was Lost in the Notre-Dame Fire

Many of the cathedral's treasures survived-but sadly, not all.
IMAGE GEOFFROY VAN DER HASSELT / GETTY IMAGES
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There was a moment yesterday when authorities worried that almost all of Notre-Dame Cathedral would be lost. Thankfully, some 500 firefighters—and even one priest—worked to prevent that worst-case scenario, and much of the structure remains standing. Many of the cathedral's irreplaceable artworks and relics were also saved from the blaze.

But not everything emerged unharmed. Here, a list of what's been confirmed to be lost.

THE SPIRE.

Notre-Dame's iconic, 295-foot-tall wooden spire toppled last night. The architectural feature was built during a 1859 renovation of the Cathedral, under the purview of architect Eugène Viollet-le-Duc. The Gallic rooster sculpture that topped the spire was "severely damaged," according to the New York Times. (Thankfully, sixteen statues previously situated at the spire's base had been removed last week for renovations, and are safe.)


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The damaged roof of Notre-Dame.

THE ROOF.

Two-thirds of the roof was destroyed. There are also three large "holes" in the cathedral's vaulted ceiling: one where the spire collapsed, one at the transept, and another at the vault of the north transept, per Curbed.

The overall structure was declared structurally sound, although a couple "vulnerabilities" have been identified, France’s junior interior minister Laurent Nuñez told the New York Times.


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A view of Notre-Dame’s interior, the day after the fire.

SEVERAL RELICS AND ARTWORKS.

"We have avoided a complete disaster," Maxime Cumunel, secretary general of France’s Observatory for Religious Heritage, told the Guardian. "But some five to 10 percent of the artwork has probably been destroyed, we have to face up to that."

Among the artifacts confirmed lost: a piece the Holy Crown of Thorns (separate from the main Crown of Thorns relic, which is safe), and relics tied to Saint Denis and Saint Geneviève.

It's also thought that four 17th and 18th century paintings have been at least partially damaged. The paintings will be moved to the Louvre on Friday, where experts will assess and restore them as needed.

This story originally appeared on Townandcountrymag.com.
* Minor edits have been made by the Townandcountry.ph editors.

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Chloe Foussianes
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