More articles about: Grammar

 
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Let's Facebook this, shall we?
How do you stop an entire nation from using a particular word that's been part of their culture for decades now? You take out a newspaper notice, apparently. At least, that's what Japan-based company Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd. thought to do. A ...
 
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Expert communication is the key to success.
As you climb the corporate ladder to the top, it's best to watch what you say and how you say it.To help, we've formulated a list of common phrases that may be hurting your work life and we've prepared alternative statements to ...
 
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Guilty if charged.
When you’re trying to make a point, using a phrase or expression incorrectly doesn’t just look silly—it can distract people from what you wanted to say in the first place.Here are some phrases people often mix up:Lying through one’s teeth means you’re saying something ...
 
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Here's how the Truly Rich Lady would do it.
Start spreading the news.In New York City, you can find anything and everything.Want to see what hair looked like in the Victorian era? There is a scrapbook that shows just that—bits of human hair!—at the Morbid Anatomy Museum in Brooklyn.Aching for a ...
 
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Sound smarter and more credible by decluttering your sentences.
1. IrregardlessAs we’ve written before, “irregardless” is often incorrect—it’s “regardless.” The word has been in use since the early 1900s. It wasn’t initially in the dictionary but after its widespread misuse, it was added. While it might now be considered a word, ...
 
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There are a few special cases that confuse even the most thorough of grammar geeks.
1. Singular indefinite pronouns take singular verbs, and plural indefinite pronouns take plural verbs.When singular indefinite pronouns such as anyone, everyone, each, neither, none, or everything are used as subjects in a sentence, they also demand singular verbs and follow the same grammar ...
 
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It's not a "doggy-dog world" out there.
1. One in the same and one and the sameTo say that two entities are the same thing or person, one should refer to them as “one and the same.” If one says that “Ina Garten and the Barefoot Contessa are one and ...
 
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Are you still putting words in "quotations" for emphasis?
1. Punctuation marks outside quotation marksAmerican English rules state that punctuation marks such as commas, periods, and question marks, which are part of the overall sentence must be placed within quotation marks, as in the correct example above. Exemptions are punctuation marks ...
 
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She is a grammar Nazi, a champion of the written word, including the intricacies of its use.
Do you want to ask our resident TRL a question? E-mail C.C. Coo at [email protected]  Readers, I am now going to reveal a very personal secret. I am obsessed with the comma, in particular, its most divisive form, the serial comma.If you are ...
 
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When you think about it, a bonus is already added happiness.
Common phrases, unnecessary words. Let’s keep things simple. No need to repeat.        ATM machineATM stands for automated teller machine. Spare yourself the effort of saying “machine.” That’s what the acronym is for—communication as fast as the ATM delivers cash.Repeat againThis phrase ...
 
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Sometimes hilarious, most of the time embarrassing.
SUPPOSE TO BE VS. SUPPOSED TO BE“I know the movie was suppose to be sad but I found it funny.”“Supposed to be” means something was planned or intended to happen or is an obligation. It means “expected to.” You don’t say “You ...
 
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Impeccable grammar starts with the correct use of "is" and "are."
Correct subject-verb agreement is the foundation of good grammar. It is easy enough to know that the singular noun "magazine" requires the singular verb "is." But what if the subject is tricky and is not in a recognizably plural form? The best way ...
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