Jewelry & Watches

Watch Queen Victoria's Daughter's Stunning Royal Tiara Be Transformed into a Necklace

The priceless diadem can double as a diamond neckpiece.
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This year marks Queen Victoria's 200th birthday, and the Historic Royal Palaces are celebrating with an exhibition at Kensington Palace. To amp up anticipation for the show, they've just released a fascinating, diamond-filled video.

In the clip, an expert slowly transforms a fringe tiara, which was once worn by Queen Victoria's daughter Princess Louise into a stunning necklace. The process is actually fairly simple: the jeweler just separates the chain of diamonds from a structured base. See how it works above.

This particular piece was made in a "kokoshnik" style, a Russian-inspired look that was popular at the end of the 19th century, according to the Historic Royal Palaces. A more famous example of the style, known as "Queen Alexandra's Kokoshnik Tiara," is one of Queen Elizabeth's favorites. She's been photographed wearing it at numerous banquets and special occasions over the years, dating back to the 1950s.

According to royal jewel expert The Court Jeweller, the Queen first inherited the Queen Alexandra's Kokoshnik Tiara in 1953, after Queen Mary died, but its history goes back much further.

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Queen Alexandra wears the Kokoshnik tiara

The tiara was originally made for the Princess of Wales (the future Queen Alexandra), to commemorate her and the Prince of Wales's silver wedding anniversary in 1888. As the British aristocracy wasn't exactly flush with cash at the time, a committee of women had to combine their resources to purchase the gift.

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Instead of worrying about whether or not the princess would like her present, the women simply asked her what style of tiara she'd like. Queen Alexandra pointed to a piece worn by her sister, Russia's Empress Marie Feodorovna, for inspiration.

After Queen Alexandra's death, the diadem was bequeathed to Queen Mary, who then passed it on to Queen Elizabeth—who one day, will also pass it down.

*This article originally appeared on Townandcountrymag.com

*Minor edits have been made by the Townandcountry.ph editors

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Chloe Foussianes
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