Fashion

Remembering Ramon Valera Who Turned the Baro't Saya Into the Modern Terno

Ramon Valera accentuated the female form by puffing out the sleeves and drawing the waistline in; he also discarded the panuelo, allowing women to show more of their necklines.
IMAGE COURTESY OF THE CENTER FOR CAMPUS ART
Comments

The Center for Campus Art of the De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde presents “Ramon Valera and the Modern,” an exhibit on the life and designs of the late National Artist for Fashion, as its first show for the school year. Several well-preserved samples of his exquisite dresses and gowns will be exhibited, providing the chance for students and fashion plates the chance to see the innovations Valera introduced to Philippine fashion.

Born in Abra in 1912 and educated in Manila (fittingly, at De La Salle College) Valera made his name when he revolutionized the traditional baro’t saya and turned it into the modern terno. Previously consisting of four separate articles of clothing—blouse, skirt, overskirt, and a long scarf or panuelo, the female national garb was simplified into a one-piece ensemble. Valera accentuated the female form by puffing out the sleeves and drawing the waistline in; he also discarded the panuelo, allowing women to show more of their necklines, challenging conservative modes of dressing.


In the context of Valera’s life and times, the CCA’s gallery will have as a backdrop images of post-war Manila, the visual representations of the era’s art and architecture, along with its graphic, furniture, and interior designs. The years between the 1950s and 1970s—when Valera was at the peak of his powers—will be highlighted. Inspired by Valera, students from the Fashion Design and Merchandising program will showcase their own interpretations of the terno, perhaps starting a fashion revolution of their own. The show is presented in partnership with the Tantoco-Rustia Foundation, whose president, Zenaida Tantoco, was instrumental in tracking down and obtaining the garments on loan from several eminent families. 


Ongoing until October 7, 12th Floor Gallery, School of Design and Arts Campus, De La Salle-College of St. Benilde, Pablo Ocampo Street, Manila.

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

This story was originally published in the September 2017 issue of Town&Country.

Comments
View More Articles About:
About The Author
Pierre A. Calasanz
View Other Articles From Pierre A. Calasanz
Comments
Latest Stories
 
Share
Cheers to the days when beautiful celebrities didn't take themselves too seriously.
 
Share
The Princess's mother loved that Eugenie was able to make a statement with her dress.
 
Share
Her son's name, which was reportedly revealed over the weekend, is a nod to Prince William as well.
 
Share
 
Share
This year, give a gift that's (almost) as glamorous as her.
 
Share
From the spectacular dishes at our 61 partner restaurants to our fabulous guests who partied way past midnight at Sage.
 
Share
In a quest to become as eco-friendly as possible, the Prince has discovered a new level of luxury transit.
 
Share
Take a peek inside the most sought-after suite at this fabulous Croatian retreat.
 
Share
The golden-haired founder of Steps Dance celebrates a milestone.
 
Share
Prince Charles laid a wreath at the Cenotaph in honor of those who have died in war.
 
Share
The Palace just released this sweet photo of Louis and his grandpa Prince Charles.
 
Share
The Queen's Gallery is hosting a new survey of artworks gifted between the two monarchies.
Load More Articles
CONNECT WITH US