Beauty
The T&C Beauty Survey: Women Answer Everything You're Curious To Know
What do women spend on? What do they think is the perfect age? If they could change a body part, what would it be?
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We polled over a hundred female Town&Country personalities in their 30s, 40s, and 50s to learn about their biggest beauty concerns, what they spend on to look good, and when they feel their prettiest. Here are some of the most interesting results.

Lipstick is still the best instant beauty pick-me-up.


Sixty-five percent of women say that lipsticks and lip glosses are their most patronized beauty product, with an average purchase of two tubes in a month. Women don’t need to run out of lipstick to get a new one, unlike makeup foundation bottles and compacts, which place second in the “most purchased” category. They’re bought once every two months when they’ve run out—on the average.

When it comes to putting on makeup, they believe the simpler, the better.


Fifty-four percent say that their partner finds them most attractive when they’re just casually made up with the most basic tools: powder, lip gloss, mascara, eye brow pencil, blush. Forty percent, on the other hand, are found most attractive when they’re dolled up for a night out. As for the rest, they say when they’re “totally makeup-free.” Still, a good 67 percent say they wear makeup every day.

The T&C lady prefers getting her makeup and skincare products at the department store or abroad rather than online.


Women still like the actual feeling of shopping—they want to touch, test, and experience the product before they buy, making department store shopping a must in their activities. Seventy-five percent buy from department stores and actual stores; 14 percent buy online, and 11 percent head to drugstores. When abroad, 60 percent make sure to make a trip to Sephora, Barneys, Harvey Nichols, Bon Marche or other department stores to buy beauty products not available in Manila.

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Aging is their most important beauty concern but that doesn’t mean they’re afraid of it.


There is certainly more pressure on women than on men to look young. Sixty-three percent consider wrinkles, dark spots, under-eye circles, and facial lines to be the top concern—next to their weight and figure—making anti-aging creams and serums and sunblock staples on their dressing tables. But many of them are also wiser to say that “one can only do so much” and that they’re not afraid to look old one day.

Women will always try to be prettier and look younger.


A full 82 percent admit they undergo beauty treatments and procedures to look and feel better. Seventy-two percent of those get anti-aging and skin enhancing facials and a good 12.5 percent get regular Botox injections. Other regular procedures? Weekly mani/pedis, of course, say 81 percent, and spa massages.

When it comes to going under the knife, they’re almost equally divided.


Half our respondents have no qualms about getting a facelift, liposuction, and plastic surgery. Over 70 percent would consider getting Botox at some point as well as stem cell therapy. But when we asked them what procedure they will never try, 71 percent answered rhinoplasty or a nose job.

They want to be 33 forever.

We asked them to pick an ideal age solely based on physical attributes and not considering life lessons and experiences. On average, if they could pick an age to be forever, it would be 33. We also asked at what age they think a woman’s beauty peaks, and they answered, on average, 35.

Women are willing to spend for the right products and they shop for makeup more often as they do for clothes.


We asked the ladies how much they spend on new makeup or skincare products in a month (they make a trip to department stores at least once a week), and we got an average of P8,000. As for a one-time non-invasive beauty treatment (facial, lasers, slimming procedures, etc.), they’re willing to spend an average of P20,200 per treatment.

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If they could change a body part, they would choose their stomach.


Fifty-three percent are not satisfied with their tummies, which they wish could be slimmer and flatter. A good number also say they stress about their arms and thighs (39 percent).

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About The Author
Nicole Limos
Managing Editor
Nicole’s career in publishing began in 2006. Before becoming Town&Country online’s managing editor, she moved from features editor to beauty editor of the title’s print edition. “The lessons in publishing are countless,” she says. “The most crucial ones for me? That to write best about life, you need to live your life. And another I still struggle to live by: ‘Brevity is a virtue; verbosity is a vice.’”
View Other Articles From Nicole
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