Philanthropy

How a Chance Encounter in Pasay Turned Into an Animal Rescue Organization

A local rescue organization advocates animal welfare in Pasay.
IMAGE COURTESY ASHLEY FRUNO
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A random bus ride changed Pasay Pups founder Ashley Fruno’s life in 2010. “I was waiting at a bus terminal in Pasay for a bus to Tagaytay when I spotted a dirty, tick-infested, emaciated dog at the terminal and decided to buy him some food,” Fruno recalls. “His name, I learned from the people working in the area, was Wade. We became fast friends. The next weekend, I returned with some tick treatment and another meal for Wade. Soon I met some of the other dogs that called the area home, and, somewhat unintentionally, began caring for them.” Fruno began visiting every other week to check on the dogs’ conditions and advise their owners on how to care for them, but soon, weekly Saturday visits became routine.


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Fruno’s rescue work eventually expanded to include a large housing complex behind the bus station. “I began spaying and neutering a small number of animals each month and having them vaccinated at the same time. I never imagined it would grow to be the force for change that it is now.” Her efforts have since grown substantially with the rest of the volunteers of Pasay Pups: every month, they spay or neuter more than 50 animals, and vaccinate hundreds more each year. Saturday mornings are busy for the team who make the time to care for animals in the area, “including meeting their basic veterinary needs, such as parasite control, preventing infections in minor wounds, treating illnesses, giving flea and tick prevention, and curing skin conditions like sarcoptic mange or fungal infections,” Fruno says. “We provide food, baths, and walks for chained dogs in order to show people the best way to care for their animals. We also deliver sturdy dog houses for chained dogs who are exposed to the elements.”

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Fruno’s advocacy also includes providing the community with the resources to care for their animals, “and leading them towards animal welfare practices through our example.” Fruno’s work focuses on the following key areas: spaying and neutering, vaccination, and humane education, which includes lessening the fear of and misconceptions around strays. “We know that changing people’s attitudes about animals is an important part of the fight for better animal welfare, and we’re helping to raise a kinder generation.” For more information on how you can help, log on to pasaypups.com.

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This story was originally published in the March 2018 issue of Town&Country.

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Maria Milagros G. Augustines
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