Money & Power

Here's What O.J. Simpson's Life Is Like Now That He's Out on Parole

The former NFL star spent some time on the putting green last week.
IMAGE JASON BEAN-POOL/GETTY IMAGES
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O.J. Simpson was released from prison on October 1 after nine years behind bars for a 2007 armed robbery in Las Vegas. "I've done my time," the 70-year-old Simpson said at his parole hearing last July. "I've done it as well and as respectfully as I think anyone can."

He may have completed his sentence, but Simpson has outstanding debts to settle, specifically the roughly $70 million he owes the families of Ron Goldman and Nicole Brown Simpson after interest from the $33.5 million they were awarded at a 1996 civil trial.

Simpson still has access to some resources, however. While money that he makes (like the $3 to $5 million he's reportedly expecting for his first televised interview) is subject to seizure to satisfy the debt, income from Social Security and pensions that he receives is not. "Pensions are bulletproof," David Cook, a Goldman family attorney, told Fox News. "Absent divine intervention, they are nearly impossible to topple. This is frustrating."

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O.J. Simpson was granted parole at a hearing at Lovelock Correctional Center in Nevada on July 20.

A friend of Simpson's told USA Today that Simpson invested $5 million in a personal pension. He also receives money from pensions through the Screen Actors Guild and NFL, which pays somewhere between $1,700 and $25,000 a month. When the accounts are combined, it adds up to about $300,000 a year for the former football star.

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All in all, current estimates of Simpson's net worth range from GoBankingRates.com's $250,000 to CelebrityNetWorth.com's $3 million.

And where will he settle? While Simpson's lawyer told the New York Times that he is "going to wind up in Florida," the state's attorney general, Pam Bondi, said he isn't welcome there because of the "added dangers that his relocation would pose to our citizens" and "a disturbing history of arrests and destructive behavior." Plus, Bondi wrote in a letter to the Florida Department of Corrections, "Our state should not become a country club for this convicted criminal."

Following his release, Simpson stayed put in Las Vegas. Simpson, who once had a 10 handicap, spent part of his first week of newfound freedom working on his golf game, "chipping and putting on some artificial turf" outside a 5,000-square-foot Las Vegas home where he's staying. He also took time on to sign sports memorabilia(which is what the 2007 robbery involved) at what TMZ called a "secret autograph session" at a Las Vegas hotel.

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This story originally appeared on Townandcountrymag.com.
* Minor edits have been made by the Townandcountry.ph editors.

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Sam Dangremond
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