The Queen Just Got a £6 Million Raise to Fund a Renovation of Buckingham Palace
But how much will it cost the public?

The Queen will receive an eight percent increase in income from public funds after the government's decision to increase her funding to cover "essential works" to Buckingham Palace.

The Crown Estate, which owns the majority of Regent Street, parts of St. James's and thousands of acres of farmland, forests, and coastline, saw its profits rise by £24 million (via BBC News).

The Sovereign Grant, which pays for the salaries of the Monarch's household, official travel, and upkeep of palaces, will increase by £6 million from 2018.

The rise has been agreed as part of Buckingham Palace's extensive repairs, which is costing £369 million. Officials have said that the restoration work was essential to avoid "catastrophic building failure."

How much will that cost individual members of the public?

Sir Alan Reid, Keeper of the Privy Purse, said: "When you look at these accounts, the bottom line is the Sovereign Grant last year equated to 65p per person, per annum, in the United Kingdom. That's the price of a first class stamp. Consider that against what the Queen does and represents for this country, I believe it represents excellent value for money."

And a few more expenses have been revealed. Clarence House has revealed that the Queen and the Royal Family's official travel cost the taxpayer £4.5 million during 2016/17, up £500,000.

The accounts show that Prince Philip spent £18,690 on a train trip to Plymouth, to attend a dinner at the Royal Marines barracks.

It also cost an estimated £154,000 for Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall to hire government Voyager on charter for a week-long trip to Romania, Italy, and Austria.

Officials said that members of the Royal family "quite frequently" traveled business rather than first class, adding: "If you are expected to arrive and be greeted formally by a head of state and do all sort of engagements when you land, there is quite a strong argument to go in as comfortable a fashion as you can."

Not everyone is happy with the increase, with some criticizing the government and lamenting the cuts to the public sector on Twitter.

Republic, which campaigns for an elected head of state, said it was a "massive bill for the taxpayer" to support "privileged lifestyles."

What do you think?

This story originally appeared on Townandcountrymag.com.

* Minor edits have been made by the Townandcountry.ph editors.

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