Heritage

Here's Your First Look at Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's Joint Royal Monogram

Australian journalist Georgie Gardner got a sneak peek in a personal letter.
IMAGE GETTY IMAGES/ SAMIR HUSSEIN
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Just two months after their wedding, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are taking another step into solidifying their union as a married couple. The royals have started to use a joint monogram in official letterheads.

Journalist Georgie Gardner of Australia's The Today Show was the first person to publicly reveal Meghan and Harry's conjugal monogram during a live broadcast of her show Wednesday. In the clip below, Gardner shares that she received a thank you note from the royal newlyweds after she gave them a wedding present.

Around the 1:54 mark, Gardner reads the sweet letter out loud, which includes an apology from the couple for sending it so late. "As you can hopefully understand, it has been a very busy time for us," the anchorwoman reads. She then notes that the letter must be legitimate, because the handwriting appeared to be perfect. (Meghan, as we know, is an expert calligrapher).

At 2:48, a close-up of the monogram shows that Meghan and Harry have combined the 'H' and 'M' in their names under a coronet to create their royal cypher, which is endearingly in royal blue. The color choice was reportedly picked by Harry for his own cypher as a tribute to his late mother, Princess Diana.

By tradition, each member of the British royal family has their own monogram, or royal cypher, and each couple has a conjugal cypher. According to The Postal Museum, a royal cypher is a monogram-like design that a reigning monarch uses in official letterheads, but other members of the family use them as well.

Meghan's own monogram was released in May, and it featured a script 'M' with a coronet. The design bears a resemblance to her conjugal cypher with her husband.

The crown above the 'H' and 'M' appears to be the one approved by a Royal Warrant of 1917 for the sons and daughters of the heir apparent. It features two crosses patée (a type of Christian cross), four fleurs-de-lys, and two strawberry leaves.

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This story originally appeared on Townandcountrymag.com.
* Minor edits have been made by the Townandcountry.ph editors.

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