Heritage

Meghan Markle Just Gave a Powerful Speech About Feminism in New Zealand

"Women's suffrage is about feminism, but feminism is about fairness."
IMAGE GETTY IMAGES / KIRSTY WIGGLESWORTH - PA IMAGES
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In her role as Duchess of Sussex, Meghan Markle continues to use her newfound international profile to highlight the causes and issues that are important to her. On October 28, she gave a powerful speech in New Zealand about feminism at a celebration of the 125th anniversary of women's suffrage in the country.

"In looking forward to this very special occasion, I reflected on the importance of this achievement, but also the larger impact of what this symbolizes," she said.

"Because yes—women's suffrage is about feminism, but feminism is about fairness."

Members of the royal family are publicly apolitical, but feminism isn't a political view. It is a human rights issue and one that Meghan is eager to champion.

WATCH A CLIP OF MEGHAN'S SPEECH HERE, THEN READ THE FULL TRANSCRIPT BELOW:


We are proud to be able to join you tonight in celebrating the 125th anniversary of women's suffrage in your country.

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The achievements of the women of New Zealand who campaigned for their right to vote, and were the first in the world to achieve it, are universally admired.

In looking forward to this very special occasion, I reflected on the importance of this achievement, but also the larger impact of what this symbolizes.

Because yes—women's suffrage is about feminism, but feminism is about fairness.

Suffrage is not simply about the right to vote but also about what that represents. The basic and fundamental human right of being able to participate in the choices for your future and that of your community. The involvement and voice that allows you to be a part of the very world you are a part of.

And women's suffrage is not simply about the right to vote for women, but also about what that represents.

The basic and fundamental human right of all people—including members of society who have been marginalized—whether for reasons of race, gender, ethnicity, or orientation—to be able to participate in the choices for their future and their community.

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So bravo, New Zealand, for championing this right 125 years ago—for the women who well deserve to have an active voice and acknowledged vote, and for all of the people that this effort has paved the way for globally.

We all deeply thank you.

In the words of your suffragette Kate Sheppard, "All that separates, whether race, class, creed, or sex, is inhuman, and must be overcome."

*This story originally appeared on Townandcountrymag.com

*Minor edits have been made by the Townandcountry.ph editors

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