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Body Language Experts Analyze Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip's Relationship Through the Years

The way Prince Philip looks at his wife hasn't changed in 70 years.
IMAGE GETTY/ FOX PHOTOS/ MAX MUMBY/ INDIGO
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After 70 years of marriage, Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip know a thing or two about love. The couple has seen it all: alleged affairs, the tragic death of their daughter-in-law, and even the birth of their great-grandchildren. Through everything, the couple has had the unwavering love and support of one another — and we've all been fortunate to witness this tremendous love story in action.

While the royal couple keeps their PDA behind closed doors, there have been a few instances over the decades that confirm true love is alive and well — and their body language is proof.


Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip in October 1972.

"When you look beyond the royal formality of Prince Phillip and Queen Elizabeth's public appearances, you clearly see Prince Phillip's love and adoration for his Queen," Blanca Cobb, body language expert and author of Methods of the Masters, told GoodHousekeeping.com. He does whatever it takes to be closer to his wife — and in this particular case, he even moves his cane aside to reduce the space between them.

Most of the time, the Queen is rather guarded, trying to prove her independence. "Queen Elizabeth is always trying to be seen as her own person," Patti Wood, body language expert and author of SNAP: Making the Most of First Impressions, Body Language, and Charisma told GoodHousekeeping.com. She leans on her husband out of necessity, rather than affection. This doesn't imply that she is never affectionate with her husband, she simply waits until the world isn't watching.


Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip visiting Tuvalu in 1982

When Prince Philip leans toward his wife, that indicates that he is completely focused on her. Even when they're spectators at a formal ceremony, his eyes are on the Queen. To complement his lean, the Prince isn't afraid to showcase pure joy with a crack of a genuine smile.

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Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip visiting parliament in 1993

It's expected for the royal couple to be more rigid than the younger generations — she's the Queen, after all! Despite the formality of the occasion, Prince Philip and the Queen still have a ritual of their secret touch — a hand hold. "This type of hand hold is seen time and time again," says Wood. "It's more formal than interlocking fingers but it's unique to them. It's their way of reassurance and comfort."


Prince Philip and Queen Elizabeth visiting parliament in 2000.

As they age, the Queen is becoming more dependent on Prince Philip. "In her older years, the Queen holds hands with the Prince for assistance as opposed to affection," explains Woods. In these moments, the Prince is armed and ready. "He's constantly looking at the Queen to make sure that she's okay. He's completely in tune with her needs," says Cobb.


Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip in March 2015.

It's clear that these two lovebirds are wildly in love, even after a lifetime together. See, there's still hope for the rest of us!

From: Good Housekeeping US

*This story originall appeared on Townandcountrymag.com
*Minor edits have been made by the Townandcountry.ph editors

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