Arts & Culture

See the First Photos from Matthew Weiner's New Show About the Romanovs

The anthology series centers around people who believe themselves to be the modern-day descendants of the Romanov family.
IMAGE SARAH SHATZ
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Mathew Weiner's follow up to Mad Men is The Romanoffs, an anthology series centered around people who believe themselves to be the modern-day descendants of the Romanov family. Here's what we know about the show so far.

AMAZON JUST RELEASED FOUR NEW STILLS OF THE SERIES. SEE THEM ALL BELOW.


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THE ROMANOFFS WILL PREMIERE ON AMAZON PRIME ON OCTOBER 12.

Despite being on the streaming platform, the series will roll out week to week, episodically.

"Every single episode—and there will be eight—has a different cast, a different story and a different location," Weiner told The Hollywood Reporter in March of 2017. "The thing that holds them together is that all of the stories involve people who believe themselves to be descendants of the Romanov [family]."

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Watch one trailer below, and one up top:

THE CAST IS FULL OF MAD MEN ALUMS.

Christina Hendricks and John Slattery both star in the series. Other cast members include Diane Lane, Isabelle Huppert, Jack Huston, Amanda Peet, Aaron Eckhart, Marthe Keller, Corey Stoll, Andrew Rannells, and Paul Reiser.

Behind the scenes, Janie Bryant will design the costumes for the program along with Wendy Chuck, perhaps best known for her work on Spotlight.

In total, Deadline reports there are 14 Mad Men alums on the show's creative team.

HERE'S THE BACKSTORY.

Of course, the Romanov family was the last dynasty to rule Russia from 1613 until the Bolsheviks seized power in 1917. In July of 1918, Tsar Nicholas II, Tsarina Alexandra, and their five children and remaining loyal servants were executed, a slaughter that has, over the years, inspired conspiracy theories, including the myth that Nicholas and Alexandra's daughter Anastasia survived the attack. Weiner's unconventional spelling of the Russian surname reportedly reflects both the pronunciation and how it was spelled up until recently.

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"We're at a place in our history where people are looking for a close connection to their roots, and for some kind of revelation about who they are," Weiner explained to Variety. "There's great debate about who is a Romanoff and what happened to the Romanoffs. The story for me is that we're all questioning who we are and who we say we are."

This story originally appeared on Townandcountrymag.com.
* Minor edits have been made by the Townandcountry.ph editors.

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