Manners & Misdemeanors
Plane Etiquette: How to Deal With Line Cutters, Snorers, Shared Armrests
Basic manners to keep in mind when traveling.
IMAGE Suhyeon Choi / Unsplash
Comments

How do I deal with snoring seatmates and loud neighbors?

If your neighbors are rowdy, direct your concern to a flight attendant. If you are within close range to a wailing baby or a loud snorer, ask for earplugs. Do not take matters into your own hands and ask for them to switch seats. If you want to move to a different seat yourself, ask a flight attendant.

Should I use the shared armrest?

According to the Washington Post, passengers seated by the aisle may use their respective armrests but the middle passenger should be able to use the shared armrest. If you are seated by the window or by the aisle, allow the middle passenger to put his arms down first before staking your claim.

May I recline my seat?

While the feature is there for you to enjoy, it's always best to take your neighbor’s comfort into consideration, especially if you notice that space is limited. Author of Etiquette Secrets and founder of The Good Manners Company Anna Musson suggests that you avoid reclining your seat if the flight is less than three hours; for longer flights, you may recline your seat but only after meal service to allow the passenger behind you to use his or her tray table comfortably. If you simply must recline your seat, at least inform the passenger behind you.

How do I address the unavoidable problem of line cutters?

At ports of public transportation, you're bound to encounter passengers who are perpetually in a rush. Should you run into someone who insists on cutting in line ahead of you, give them the benefit of the doubt and motion to the back of the line to let them know where to queue, in case it was an accident. A more gracious method is to inquire if the offender is in a hurry. That gives them time to think about their response, acknowledge the mistake, and make amends to follow the queue. If they ignore your inquiry, just let it go.

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

I’m traveling with children. How do I avoid becoming a nuisance to other travelers?

Traveling with small children is never smooth sailing for both the parents and the other passengers. According to etiquette consultant and mother Jo Bryant, it’s your duty as parents to arm yourselves with any form of entertainment or distractions that will keep your children calm well-behaved during the voyage. You may also opt to board the vessel last to give your children a few extra minutes of legroom and play time.

Is it acceptable to put my feet up?

No. Keep your shoes on and your feet within the allotted space. Public transportation, airplanes included, are germ-infested. You would either be adding to the bacteria or exposing yourself to it. Resting your feet on another seat is even worse than going barefoot. Not only are you sprawling on territory that’s outside of what you paid for, you are also increasing your chances of being featured on Passenger Shaming

Comments
View More Articles About:
About The Author
Hannah Lazatin
Senior Staff Writer
View Other Articles From Hannah Lazatin
Comments
Latest Stories
 
Share
A Ting Hun is much more than an extravagant exchange of gifts.
 
Share
The supermodel opens up about her coding nonprofit.
 
Share
Here's what you need to know about the history, the dress code, and how to get a coveted ticket to the royal enclosure from someone who's actually attended.
 
Share
Royals and their fellow racegoers are wearing their finest millinery for the Queen's favorite event.
 
Share
It's the Queen's favorite event of the year!
 
Share
An Instagram-worthy trip to paradise, a European flower festival, and other getaways that are perfect for the month ahead.
 
Share
"Dead Whale" was inspired by the 38-foot juvenile sperm whale washed ashore on Samal Island in Davao del Norte in 2016.
 
Share
Located in the City of Dreams Macau, Morpheus represents a new chapter in entertainment culture and hospitality for Asia.
 
Share
You’ll want to buy everything in this sophisticated space.
 
Share
Three restaurants in Japan, six in the U.S., seven in Spain, and more to add on your travel Eat List.
 
Share
Prince Louis isn't the only new baby in the royal family.
Load More Articles
CONNECT WITH US