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Here's How to Start Using the Rainbow Pride Button on Facebook

Start reacting to Facebook posts with a burst of color!
IMAGE Tony Webster/ Wikimedia Commons
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Facebook react buttons have quickly integrated the emoji culture into the social media website and everybody loves them. Every so often, Mark Zuckerberg and his team surprise us with a new reaction, available for a limited period of time. In celebration of Mother’s Day, we were treated to an adorable purple flower button that debuted a couple times afterward as a "thankful" button. This month, Facebook keeps up with the LGBTQ community for Pride month, which allows users to freely react to posts of the many rallies, parties, and parades that take place during the season of Pride celebrations.

You might have already seen the rainbow reaction button going around but in case you don’t have it yet, here’s how you can get it:

  1. Log into Facebook.
  2. Like the [email protected]

Voila! You can now react with rainbows.

The rainbow Pride button traces its history back to the first rainbow flag made by Gilbert Baker, who died in March this year. Baker made the flags with a group of volunteers and first used them at a San Francisco gay pride parade on June 25, 1978. Back then, the flag had eight colors, but it has since been cut down to six. San Francisco Pride takes place this weekend, June 24 and 25, and is the largest gathering of the LGBT community and allies in the United States.

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Gilbert Baker at the San Francisco Gay Pride Festival in 2015

Recent reports have found that not everybody has access to the react button. Twitter users have discovered that users from countries with openly anti-LGBTQ regimes cannot use the button. Users from Egypt, Singapore, Malaysia, Mexico, Jordan, and Brazil have reportedly been unable to use the Pride button. Facebook vice president Alex Schultz wrote a blog post: “People in major markets with Pride celebrations will be able to use a temporary rainbow reaction during Pride month.” Many have complained that this limitation defeats the purpose of the button, although the [email protected] page hopes to make it available in more areas soon.

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About The Author
Hannah Lazatin
Senior Staff Writer
Hannah is a communications graduate from Ateneo de Manila University. She’s originally from Pampanga and from a big, close-knit family who likes to find a reason to get together at the dinner table. Experiences inspire her. “Once, at a restaurant, I received an interpretation of my second name ‘Celina,’ and it meant 'someone who tries everything once' and that is me through and through,” she says. As for the job, she wants her “readers to be inspired by the stories of the people we feature and to move them to reach for greater things.”
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