Food & Drink

Champagne's Last Taboo Falls: It's Now Fine to Drink Bubbles on Ice

With a new crop of champagne blends meant to be served over ice, bubbles are more than just cool. They are ice cold.
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When it comes to champagne, what's cooler than being cool? Ice cold.

For many years, champagne was seen as something ceremonial and rigid, only served at a precise temperature and with specific glassware. Now winemakers are introducing new blends of bubbles that are casual, fun, and meant to be served bracingly cold.

The new way to drink champagne? In a large goblet with a healthy handful of ice cubes. Americans may raise their eyebrows but winemakers say the iced champagne tradition began with the French themselves.

"We found some emerging trends in the south of France, of drinking champagne with ice," Moët & Chandon chef de cave Benoît Gouez says. "We realized that during the warmer season, people want to drink chic but they also need to be refreshed and they want to enjoy it in a more casual way."

"Instead of saying, 'No way, champagne is too chic to add ice to it', we tried to understand what the consumers were looking for," he adds.


Moët & Chandon Ice Imperial, Veuve Clicquot Rich, and Moët & Chandon Ice Imperial Rosé

What consumers want is something like a rosé wine, a beverage that is chill in all senses of the word.

The result: Moët & Chandon Ice Imperial, the first blend developed for drinking over ice, debuted in 2011, and its sister blend, Ice Imperial Rosé, which debuted last summer. These are new products because adding too much ice to or serving a traditional champagne too cold mutes the liquid's delicate flavor profiles.

"When something is too cold, you will no longer be able to taste it," Park Hyatt New York wine director Tristan Prat-Vincent says. "The reason they have to formulate it much stronger is so that you can still taste the champagne."

The new raft of products, which includes Veuve Clicquot Rich, Pommery Royal Blue Sky, JP Chenet Ice, Calvet Ice, Champagne Lanson White Label, and François Montand Ice, feature stronger, sweeter blends, that really shine when they are frosty and slightly diluted from the ice.

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In fact, wine experts caution the new blends will not taste good on their own.


Moët & Chandon Ice Imperial was the first champagne to be sipped with ice.

"If you try to drink this champagne without ice cubes, it would be a big mistake," Pommery U.S. sales and marketing director Stan Thierry says. "It would be much too sweet." The breaking up of ice cubes in the glass is what tames the sweetness and highlights a fresh minerality, he adds.

While iced champagne makes sense for the warm-weather season, wine brands are hoping to see the new ice blends follow the trajectory of rosé. The pink wine, which first emerged as a casual summer drink, has transformed itself into a year-round easy spirit, a kind of shorthand for daytime parties and friendly gatherings.

"I would say that this is a champagne you want to drink when the sky is blue," Pommery's Thierry says, noting that even very cold days can be sunny.

While iced champagnes are served in warm-weather locations like Malibu and Hawaii, at least one ski resort is taking the ice cold trend literally. The Fairmont Tremblant, located in Quebec, Canada, where winter evening temperatures start in the low teens and drop from there, features a Veuve Clicquot bar on its outdoor pool terrace most evenings during its winter season. Since December, drink options include Veuve Clicquot Rich, served in goblets with ice and fresh garnishes.

*This story originally appeared on Townandcountrymag.com.
* Minor edits have been made by the Townandcountry.ph editors.

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