Food & Drink

Every Coffee Drinker Must Know These Brewing Methods, Bean Origins

A primer on what to taste next time you visit your favorite café.
IMAGE Pixabay
Comments

Besides giving you that much needed perk-up to start the day, coffee also gives a number of health benefits. It may ward off dementia since it provides antioxidants that prevent cell damage, according to a new study. Plain Americano does the job, but you could use a bit of variety every now and then: black, with milk, with chocolate, with tea, or even with alcohol. Some popular drinks include macchiato, latte, cappuccino, and mocha. These coffee varieties are usually espresso-based, but you can also drink them using different slow-brew methods to give you pleasant differences in taste, texture, and overall coffee experience. You can even ask the barista to pour you a Chemex by the end of this article.


THE METHOD MATTERS


Some naysayers say that coffee is coffee regardless of brewing method. The subtle distinctions, however, can affect your coffee enjoyment. Try these different slow-brews to decide which one you most prefer:

Espresso

The most familiar of all is the espresso. Coffee chains usually use espresso machines because they deliver strong coffee—really, what every person on-the-go needs. They brew ground coffee quickest (around 30 seconds) and produce the strongest and most acidic form. When combined with water or frothy or steamy milk, espressos become the Americanos, lattes, and cappuccinos we take daily.

French Press or Cafetière

Also known as coffee press, coffee pot, or coffee plunger, the French Press brews coarse-ground coffee by letting it seep (much like tea) for four to six minutes. It is ready to pour after pressing the metal plunger to filter the grounds, thus the namesake. Because there are no paper filters, this type of brew retains all of the oils in the coffee—which makes for a full-bodied, rich cup of coffee.

AeroPress

The AeroPress is a simple gadget that was invented by an engineer named Alan Adler. AeroPress extracts coffee via air pressure, which is done by pressing a plunge into a tube with water and coffee directly into your mug using a paper filter. This produces a very clear and clean coffee flavor with smooth mouthfeel in under 60 seconds.

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

Chemex

The Chemex is a pour-over style coffee maker made with glass in an elegant shape. It slow-brews coffee much like how a drip-coffee method does. Using slightly finer grounds than those of the French Press, the beans are brewed with a paper filter and the coffee is allowed to steep and drip into the lower part of the container for four to six minutes. Enjoy smooth, bold and rich coffee every time.


CAN BLACK COFFEE TASTE MORE INTERESTING?


Add dimension to the flavor of your black coffee by considering another factor—origin. Millennial coffee snobs love drinking Ethiopian AeroPressed black coffee or Guatemalan pour-over. You can enjoy the spectrum of flavors each continent can offer, too. Here’s what the general taste in coffee are in the different regions of the world.

  • Central Americas (Guatemala, Mexico) – high acidity, apple/cherry notes, chocolate

  • South Americas (Colombia, Peru) – mellow acidity, sweet, medium-bodied, nutty

  • Africa (Kenya, Ethiopia) – mellow acidity, savory sweet with flowery notes

  • Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Vietnam, Philippines) – low acidity, sweet, earthy, and chocolate

The next time you’re feeling a little adventurous with your cup of coffee, ask for a lovely cup of Guatemalan pour-over.

Comments
View More Articles About:
About The Author
Kit SIngson
View Other Articles From Kit SIngson
Comments
Latest Stories
 
Share
An elite group of artists are growing in influence and reach. Here's the key to cracking their codes.
 
Share
Let these broad strokes be your quick-test when governing the sometimes ungovernable.
 
Share
“Your age is less chronological and more attitudinal," she says.
 
Share
It will be the first lunar mission taken by humans since NASA sent Apollo 17 there in 1972.
 
Share
With Basquiats, Modiglianis, and Picassos going for upwards of $100 million, the stakes have never been higher.
 
Share
How one woman is taking on an rampant problem of counterfeit wines.
 
Share
"My character wasn’t written to be Filipino-American, they actually changed her to give me this role," says Danielle Lyn.
 
Share
Chris Do, along with other expert creatives, will take part in CITEM’s CREATE Philippines.
 
Share
The Duke was there to celebrate the organization's 30th anniversary.
 
Share
Jewelry crimes might be rising but gemologists aren't worried.
Load More Articles
CONNECT WITH US