Design

The Interior Design Trends to Try This Year

Designers and experts make their recommendations for how to refresh your décor.
IMAGE COURTESY I WANT WALLPAPER
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BROWN FURNITURE


Lucy Barlow, the co-founder and creative director of Barlow & Barlow, says: “Warm and inviting schemes bursting with color and pattern are becoming more prevalent, and nothing complements this look better than antique brown furniture. This once-undesired wood is enjoying a resurgence: it adds a depth of character and richness to any scheme. We might include 19th-century commodes in hallways or walnut wardrobes in bedrooms, and we love refurbishing occasional tables or commodes into washstands.”

GALLERY WALLS


Sophie Elborne, the creative director at Kitesgrove, says: “A gallery wall of framed drawings, paintings or prints takes the pressure off the individual artwork and creates interesting relationships between each. Here, a neatly grouped series of pressed botanicals dresses the large expanse of wall above the headboard and completes an otherwise very simply furnished bedroom. Achieve this look by framing pressed flowers, leaves, feathers, or anything flat – go for at least six and adapt the frame size to your space.”

ARTISANAL HOMEWARES WITH GLOBAL APPEAL


Lisa Mehydene, the creative director and founder of Edit58.com, says: “When shopping for interiors, people are increasingly eschewing mass-produced pieces in favor of one-off artisanal products from around the world: for example, handcrafted pottery from the southern Moroccan village of Tamegroute (pictured) or cushions crafted out of vintage Berber blankets. The desire to create eclectic spaces will see us searching remote corners of the world for truly individual finds with ‘globe-trotter’ appeal.”

COLOR BLOCKING


The interior designer Fran Hickman says: “My favorite trend is the painted graphic color blocking of Nathalie du Pasquier, seen here at the Camden Arts Centre. I first came across du Pasquier’s work when I discovered her patterned Riviera carpet in David Bowie’s sale through Sotheby’s in 2016. A player in the Memphis group, the radical postmodern design movement, she has experienced a recent revival with her bright colors and bold forms.” Image: installation view of ‘Nathalie Du Pasquier: Other Rooms’ at Camden Arts Centre, 2017.

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MIXED MATERIALS


Tor Vivian of Tor Interiors says: “Work with the style of the house and mix materials to create a harmonious room. This bathroom combines oak flooring and Crittall Windows with a painted wood vanity unit and a steel bath. This year will be about understated tones with splashes of bright colors and interesting textures such as velvets and luxurious fabrics. Here we have mixed autumnal colors and modern fabrics in a more traditional space.”

LIGHT FANTASTIC


The interior designer Katharine Pooley says: “Chandeliers add elegance and character to a room and this year we’ll see more abstract chandelier installations made up of organic shaped glass and semi-precious stones, coral, and porcelain rather than cut crystal.”

ELEGANT TIMELESSNESS


Lorna McAleer, the brand manager for Style Studio, says: “This look celebrates history and heritage, finding inspiration in libraries and museums. Key looks are wood paneling, leather-bound books, reading nooks and scientific-specimen artwork. Colours are classic and modest; mix burgundy and warm brown colorways with mellow neutrals. Rich mahogany wood or a leather ‘Chesterfield’ sofa will infuse rooms with traditional style, but team such items with sleek, modern pieces.”

SOFT CURVES


The interior designer Natalia Miyar says: “The use of organic shapes in furniture, and in particular, the curved sofa, is my favorite trend for 2018. People are craving cocooning comfort and playfulness in design – the voluptuous lines and retro feel of a curvy sofa fulfill both aspects. I recently created a new interpretation of a fabulous sofa I saw in a Hockney painting in the Tate Britain exhibition for a London apartment. I upholstered it in a smoky-blue velvet that contrasts with the feminine lines of the sofa, giving it a modern feel.”

RAW MATERIALS


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“I’m a huge fan of modern architecture and its influence upon interior design in the form of exposed brickwork, iron frameworks, timber paneling, and beams. However, design is a layered process and it’s important when using industrial elements to combine these with soft, warmer tones and textures through furnishings and fabrics in order to create an inviting, homely environment. This could be anything from rich, smoky velvets to grey flannels and soft leathers.”

BIOPHILIA


Alex Whitecroft, the head of design at I Want Wallpaper, says: “In 1984, Dr. Edward Wilson defined biophilia as ‘the innate sense of belonging to the natural world’. Thirty-four years on, that sense of belonging is reflected in our homes. Key looks will include living walls, nature-inspired designs, and the creation of tech-free spaces with an abundance of greenery. Realistic plant-life and tree-bark designs can be introduced with wallpaper where living walls or lots of houseplants aren’t practical.”

This story originally appeared on Townandcountrymag.co.uk.
* Minor edits have been made by the Townandcountry.ph editors.

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