Design

9 Famous Women and the Sofas They Love Lounging On

When an iconic personality is paired with an iconic piece of furniture, a legend is often born.
IMAGE FEDERICO DE ANGELIS
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What does your sofa say about you? If these portraits are any indication, quite a bit, actually.

Consider Lee Radziwill in Paris, on the phone, cigarette in hand, mid-puff. Note the curve of her chignon and of her sofa, a scroll-back number in salmon silk. It's an essay in authentic, everyday elegance. Or Brooke Astor in her Albert Hadley–designed library. That sofa, in Brunschwig & Fils's La Portugaise, might as well be a throne. There's no telling how many yards of chintz the shot has sold, but there's no doubt about this: The photographer captured something of her essence, and the magic of it will long endure.

Scroll on to see what each sofa has to say about these iconic women.

Diane von Furstenberg


The Mae West Lips sofa, by Salvador Dali?, echoes the whimsical tastes of designer Diane von Furstenberg, who was photographed in 2012 in her New York headquarters.

Lee Radziwill


Lee Radziwill on a simple yet elegant scroll-back sofa in her Paris apartment in 2015.

Brooke Astor


Brooke Astor, in the 1990s, in the library designed for her by Albert Hadley. The Brunschwig & Fils chintz on the sofa has since become iconic.

Dominique de Menil


Philanthropist Dominique de Menil, in a Charles James gown, on the piece the couturier famously designed for her, circa 1950.

Betty Blake


The late Dallas arts patron Betty Blake, above, in her living room in 2007.

Tory Burch


Designer Tory Burch in 2015 on a velvet sofa inspired by a much-photographed model in Hubert de Givenchy's Paris residence.

Gloria Vanderbilt


Defying convention in Southampton, New York, in 1969, Gloria Vanderbilt covered a traditional Knole sofa in laid-back gingham.

Ruthie Sommers


When designer Ruthie Sommers paired her classic camelback sofa with a vivid David Hicks fabric, she ignited a rage for the shapely silhouette in 2005.

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Peggy Guggenheim


Angular, modern sofas in Peggy Guggenheim's Venetian palazzo in 1961 placed emphasis on her eclectic collection of art.

From: Veranda

This story originally appeared on Townandcountrymag.com.
* Minor edits have been made by the Townandcountry.ph editors.

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