Life is Good

T&C Exclusive: Hermès Carré Club Pops Up in Singapore

Redheads and blondes do have more fun.
IMAGE EDWARD HENDRICKS ©
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The glorious Hermès silk scarf debuted in 1937, a classic symbol of luxury. Known in French as the carré, the silk square has been used as a ubiquitous accessory by tastemakers around the world.

It is these clients who were recently welcomed to the Carré Club in Singapore, the latest incarnation of the chic pop-up celebration that had already opened and shut its doors in New York and Toronto. Town&Country was fortunate to be on the exclusive guest list for the immersive experience conceived by Bali Barret, artistic director of the Hermès women’s collections.


A mustachioed receptionist in a bowtie gave us a frosty welcome to the surreal, rouge-walled Club, even as he looked right through us and stared blankly ahead as he banged the bell to get us checked in. We were ushered into the Carré Click studio where we draped ourselves in silk and had our photographs taken.  


Then it was off to the Carré Park fronting the colonial mansion on Lady Hill Road, the club’s venue, where we watched four skateboarders from Paris whiz up and down a ramp whimsically decorated in a colorful carré design. Who would’ve thought this lush venue was smack in the middle of Singapore?


Back inside, we headed up the grand staircase to Carré Cut, a salon where my host Angelina and I had our hair done in shades of red copper and gold, accented with the galloping horse logo Hermès is known for. Our imaginations were instantly piqued, and we were transformed into creatures of the night ready to party.



Off we went to the Carré-OK rooms where a number of carré-themed icons played songs when clicked, and we belted out We Are the World just like Tina Turner and Diana Ross (well, at least in our wigged heads we did). 

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Next stop the Carré Disco, where we danced like John Travolta in Saturday Night Live (I know, I know, I’m showing my age with my references), our feet hopscotching the checkerboard of colored lights beneath mirrored squares of glass.


At the Carré Studio, we watched artists Octave Marsal and Théo de Gueltzl allow their creativity to run free building ink cities of tall towers among giant flowers.


Gianpaolo Pagni, an artist who hand stamps patterns on silk squares, gave me a handprint of, what else? A horse, of course.


Then there was local artist Izziyana Suhaimi, who sat quietly at her craft table embroidering Hermès silk masterpieces.


Their carré artworks and those of other artists present that night, were available at the Carré Mania boutique, where patrons waited in a snaking queue to purchase those scarves, as well as limited edition red Carré Club silk squares. The guests were all well aware of the intricate work that goes into every Hermès scarf, each one taking at least 18 months to create, woven with Brazilian silk transported to France, where it is painstakingly printed with about 27 individual colors, with edges that are hand-rolled and hand-sewn, another trademark of the luxury scarf.


We then listened in on sexy secrets whispered through old rotary phones in a space that felt like a naughty bordello, and recorded our own fantasies.


We ended the evening at the Carré Café banging on pinball machines while guzzling Champagne and munching on blinis with caviar.




Life is good.

The Hermès Carré Club pops up next on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles from November 8 to 11 and then heads on to Milan later this month.

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Yvette Fernandez
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